Recommendations for all courses

  • Confidentiality of all disability information is essential. At no time should the class be informed that a student has a disability, except at the student’s expressed request. All disability information, which the student gives to the faculty member, is to be used specifically for arranging reasonable accommodations for the course of study.
  • A detailed course syllabus, which can be made available before registration, is useful to many students with disabilities. Including this syllabus statement will also help students to know where to find help from our office.
  • Clearly spell out expectations at the beginning of the course (e.g., grading, material to be covered, assignment due dates).
  • It takes an average of six weeks to get a book tape-recorded. Please announce reading assignments well in advance for students who are using taped materials or other alternative formats.
  • All students, including students with disabilities, will benefit if you start each lecture with an outline of material to be covered during that class period. Briefly summarizing key points at the conclusion of class aids students in clarifying their notes and delineating supporting information from the main ideas you wish them to remember.
  • Present new or technical vocabulary on the blackboard, an overhead, or in a hand out. Providing examples may also convey greater meaning.
  • Give assignments both orally and in written form to avoid confusion.
  • Allow students to tape lectures for reviewing later.
  • Provide adequate opportunities for questions and answers, including review sessions.
  • For exams, supply students with study questions that demonstrate the format as well as the content of the test. Explain what constitutes a good answer and why.
  • Allow students with disabilities, who require alternate testing formats, to demonstrate mastery of course material by using methods appropriate to the student and the subject matter (e.g., extended time limits for testing, taped exams, individually proctored exams in a separate room).
  • When a test is not designed to measure a student’s mastery of basic arithmetic or spelling, allow the use of simple calculators, scratch paper, and spellers' dictionaries during exams.